Healing Touch Massage & Wellness
Massage, Pfrimmer, Reiki, Energy, Deep tissue

Frequently Asked Questions

Where will my massage or bodywork session take place?
Must I be completely undressed?
Will the practitioner be present when I disrobe?
Will I be covered during the session?
What parts of my body will be massaged?
What will the massage or bodywork feel like?
Are there different kinds of massage and bodywork?
What should I do during the massage or bodywork session?
How will I feel after the massage or bodywork session?
What are the benefits of massage and bodywork?
Are there any medical conditions that would make massage or bodywork inadvisable?

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Is PDMT just another massage technique?

A: No, rather than being another technique of massage, Pfrimmer is a specialty unto itself…a comprehensive system of corrective movements designed to aid in the restoration of damaged soft tissue in the entire body. Pfrimmer is the foundation upon which other trouble shooting techniques may be added. Pfrimmer therapists are viewed by doctors as “specialists” in the field of muscle therapy.

Q: Why is Pfrimmer considered the foundation for trouble shooting & corrective massage?

A: Because it stimulates corrective changes on the cellular level. Once the body begins to heal itself, it responds well to additional trouble-shooting such as myofascial release, positional release and trigger point work.

Q: What is the difference between Pfrimmer and regular massage?

A: Massage manipulations work with the superficial layers of muscle and move body fluids. PDMT releases adherent and fibrous muscle conditions existing in deep layers of muscle. PDMT actually corrects muscles and other tissues which have become damaged.

Q: Can Pfrimmer be incorporated into Swedish Massage?

A: No. Mixing the two in the same session would nullify the corrective system of Pfrimmer thereby canceling potential results. The two differ dramatically in concept and execution of technique. Swedish massage is designed to flush fluids toward the heart; PDMT to bring them into the cell. Swedish is designed for relaxation; Pfrimmer for correction.

Q: Is PDMT the same as Deep Muscle Therapy or other forms of deep tissue work?

A: No. Deep Muscle Massage follows the principles of Swedish Massage and is basically the same technique done more deeply.

Q: Does PDMT combine well with chiropractic and osteopathic treatments?

A: Yes! Since the skeletal & muscular systems function together, combining PDMT with chiropractic & osteopathic creates a synergistic relationship. Treatment of damaged muscles aids chiropractic & osteopathic adjustments to the skeletal system, allowing them to “hold” longer and better. Skeletal misalignments is often caused by damaged or impaired muscles. PDMT can give help at the source of many structural problems.

Q: Does PDMT combine well with physical therapy?

A: Yes! The detailed handwork “inside” the muscle bundles performed with PDMT works toward restoring the health of the muscles, thus contributing to positive results in physical therapy.

Q: Does “deep” mean painful?

A: No. Most people say that “it hurts good.” In other words, if you have a problem area, it will hurt to some degree to have it worked on, but it feels “right” to have the problem addressed. Also, “deep” doesn’t necessarily mean “hard.” With the proper technique, muscles deep in your body can be reached with a minimum of pressure.

Q: What kind of background would a Pfrimmer Therapist likely have?

A: High Academic standards set by AMTA (American Massage Therapy Association) schools have made it possible to train qualified massage therapists in the Pfrimmer profession. Because of their excellent training in hand techniques and palpation, they can readily master Pfrimmer techniques. Any potential Pfrimmer Therapist must care about people and have an inquiring mind.

Q: What are the educational prerequisites for studying to become a Pfrimmer Therapist?

A: A minimum of 500 hours of formal, in-class schooling in anatomy, physiology, pathology and body work is required.

Q: When should a doctor consider referring their patient for PDMT?

A: Referral may be warranted for conditions involving the skeletal, muscular, neurological, circulatory or respiratory systems, or in cases where any inflammatory conditions or entrapment of nerves has occurred. PDMT is indicated for the prevention as well as the correction of many health threatening problems. PDMT is also beneficial for people desiring to maintain a healthy physical state.


Where will my massage or bodywork session take place?
Your massage or bodywork session will take place in a warm, comfortable, quiet room. Soft music may be played to help you relax. You will lie on a table especially designed for your comfort.

Must I be completely undressed?
Most massage and bodywork techniques are traditionally performed with the client unclothed; however, it is entirely up to you what you want to wear. You should undress to your level of comfort. You will be properly draped during the entire session.

Will the practitioner be present when I disrobe?
The practitioner will leave the room while you undress, relax onto the table, and cover yourself with a clean sheet or towel.

Will I be covered during the session?
You will be properly draped at all times to keep you warm and comfortable. Only the area being worked on will be exposed.

What parts of my body will be massaged?
A typical full-body session will include work on your back, arms, legs, feet, hands, head, neck, and shoulders.

What will the massage or bodywork feel like?
A relaxing Swedish massage is often a baseline for clients. In a general Swedish massage, your session may start with broad, flowing strokes that will help calm your nervous system and relax exterior muscle tension. As your body becomes relaxed, pressure will gradually be increased to relax specific areas and relieve areas of muscular tension. Often, a light oil or lotion is used to allow your muscles to be massaged without causing excessive friction to the skin. The oil also helps hydrate your skin. You should communicate immediately if you feel any discomfort so that another approach may be taken. Massage and bodywork are most effective when your body is not resisting.

Are there different kinds of massage and bodywork?
There are numerous types of massage and bodywork; various techniques utilize different strokes, including basic rubbing strokes, rocking movement, posture and movement re-education, application of pressure to specific points, and more. We can discuss which methods may be most appropriate for you.

What should I do during the massage or bodywork session?
Prior to the massage, feel free to ask the practitioner any questions about the technique or the upcoming session. During the massage, make yourself comfortable. The practitioner will either gently move you or tell you what is needed throughout the session (such as lifting your arm). Many people just close their eyes and completely relax, communicating if/when they need more or less pressure, another blanket, or anything else relevant to the session. If you have any questions regarding the session or about the particular technique you are receiving, feel free to ask.

How will I feel after the massage or bodywork session?
Most people feel very relaxed. Some experience freedom from long-term aches and pains developed from tension or repetitive activity. After an initial period of feeling slowed down, people often experience increased energy, heightened awareness, and greater productivity which can last for days.

What are the benefits of massage and bodywork?
Massage and bodywork can help release chronic muscular tension and pain, improve circulation, increase joint flexibility, reduce mental and physical fatigue and stress, promote faster healing of injured muscular tissue, improve posture, and reduce blood pressure. Massage and bodywork is also known to promote better sleep, improve concentration, reduce anxiety and create an overall sense of well-being.

Are there any medical conditions that would make massage or bodywork inadvisable?
Yes. That's why it's imperative that, before you begin your session, the practitioner asks general health questions. It is very important that you inform the practitioner of any health problems or medications you are taking. If you are under a doctor's care, it is strongly advised that you receive a written recommendation for massage or bodywork prior to any session. Depending on the condition, approval from your doctor may be required.

Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals
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